Do I need to train in the summer after my club team ends the season?

For many players, summer offers an opportunity to work on fitness, foundational skills and weaknesses. For others, it may be time to recover from nagging injuries. Exactly when you should return to training and competitive play following your spring season depends on many factors including post-season schedule and physical and mental health.

While rest can be beneficial, it should rarely ever mean 100% rest. Even incorporating in light jogs and bike flushes in the days after your final matches will help propel you into summer training. If you want to improve and be a competitive player, it is important to find a rhythm and keep it during the summer even when your team ends the season. Maintaining fitness over the summer takes planning and dedication.

The summer gives players the freedom to improve on their weaknesses, fitness and work on foundation skills. Consider ball control for example. This skill is easy developed independently. Check out this link below which recommends training with different size and types of balls to improve on control: https://www.perfectsoccerskills.com/blogs/news/114817603-using-smaller-balls-to-develop-better-control. Summer is also a perfect time to work on cardio and strength training since there is no worry about being sore for matches.

Before you jump right into a summer training regime, remember one of the most important factors in planning out your summer should be your health! While many players are anxious to jump back into training, players recently recovering from injuries should use this time wisely. The last thing you want to do is further aggravate nagging injuries. If there’s been an issue with your body this spring, use summertime wisely to do physical therapy exercises and corrective stretching. This will help you strengthen and lengthen your muscle tissue, thereby preventing future injuries.

According to a recent Dutch study, high school players may be more susceptible to injury following a recent growth spurt. One doctor suggests that overuse injuries can be substantially reduced by early intervention. Check out this doctor’s recommendations and interpretation of the recent Dutch study at: https://www.socceramerica.com/publications/article/81630/teenage-growth-spurt-a-risky-time-for-soccer-inju.html

Finally, it is important to acknowledge that some group training is important even in the off-season. Even just training with a handful of teammates once or twice a week can help you stay as close to game shape as possible. Or maybe this is your opportunity to train with a new group of players in a summer league. This may provide a breath of fresh air from the same training and players you’ve been with all season. You would be surprised what kind of potential you can unlock from playing with new players, training styles, and coaches. All in all, it should go without saying that summer training is absolutely necessary for serious players.

A Parent’s Guide to Communicating With Coaches

It is important for parents to be involved with the recruiting process but parents must not be overbearing.  The prospect should be the primary point of contact – coaches are recruiting prospects, not parents.  Coaches want to learn about the prospect and the prospect needs to be able to independently demonstrate that he/she is interested in the school and soccer program.  Parents must allow the prospect to communicate with the coach and develop a rapport.  The biggest mistake parents make, is not allowing the prospect to engage with the coach.

  • Phone Calls – Parents should help with the planning of making phone calls and documenting outgoing and incoming calls.  Parents can help prospects by rehearsing outgoing calls.   Parents can also help draw out a calendar to schedule outgoing calls and document incoming calls.  This will allow both parents and prospects to keep an eye on frequency of phone calls. 
  • Text/Instant Message – We recommend that parents do not use text or instant message with coaches.  Prospects can communicate with text/instant message with any relevant questions and immediate follow-ups for questions that cannot wait until the next phone call. 
  • Email – Review the materials the prospect is sending, but let the emails come from the prospect's accounts.  It is recommended to copy parents on all emails.  Parents should be aware of developments and the process.  If parents help draft email communication, make sure it is in the voice of the prospect.  Coaches have a sense when parents are sending emails as a ghost writer.  Sending mass emails before or after tournaments is the quickest way to get your child out of a recruiting class!
  • Recruiting Materials – Parents can research ways to effectively put together cover letters, resumes, YouTube highlights etc for the prospect.  Parents can help proof these documents.  Visit our Freebies page for templates.
  • Final Decisions/Money Matters – Parents need to be involved in the recruiting process when final decisions and money matters are being discussed.  Unless the conversation is purely financial, make sure the prospect in part of it!

Register today for Collegiate Soccer Camps and get first hand guidance from college coaches.

Helpful Links
A Parents role in the recruiting process 
Bleacher report- The Role of the Parent
Guiding parents through the recruiting process

A Parent’s Guide to Communicating With Coaches

It is important for parents to be involved with the recruiting process but parents must not be overbearing.  The prospect should be the primary point of contact – coaches are recruiting prospects, not parents.  Coaches want to learn about the prospect and the prospect needs to be able to independently demonstrate that he/she is interested in the school and soccer program.  Parents must allow the prospect to communicate with the coach and develop a rapport.  The biggest mistake parents make, is not allowing the prospect to engage with the coach.

Questions- How active should parent be in communicating with coaches/colleges?  How can parents can help the process?

Phone Calls –     
Parents should help with the planning of making phone calls and documenting outgoing and incoming calls.  Parents can help prospects by rehearsing outgoing calls.   Parents can also help draw out a calendar to schedule outgoing calls and document incoming calls.  This will allow both parents and prospects to keep an eye on frequency of phone calls. 
Text/Instant Message – We recommend that parents do not use text or instant message with coaches.  Prospects can communicate with text/instant message with any relevant questions and immediate follow-ups for questions that cannot wait until the next phone call. 
Email – Review the materials the prospect is sending, but let the emails come from the prospect's accounts.  It is recommended to copy parents on all emails.  Parents should be aware of developments and the process.  If parents help draft email communication, make sure it is in the voice of the prospect.  Coaches have a sense when parents are sending emails as a ghost writer.  Sending mass emails before or after tournaments is the quickest way to get your child out of a recruiting class!
Recruiting Materials – Parents can research ways to effectively put together cover letters, resumes, YouTube highlights etc for the prospect.  Parents can help proof these documents.  Visit our Freebies page for templates.
Final Decisions/Money Matters – Parents need to be involved in the recruiting process when final decisions and money matters are being discussed.  Unless the conversation is purely financial, make sure the prospect in part of it!

Coaches perspective – Coaches are very wary of parents that want to live through their children.  Coaches want to build a solid relationship with the prospect before the four years in college. 

Helpful Links
A Parents role in the recruiting process 
Bleacher report- The Role of the Parent
Guiding parents through the recruiting process